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Sunday, July 16, 2017

Reproducibility Crisis in the Science Industry

One of the axioms we were taught about science is that someone floats a hypothesis, gives it some testing or adjustments, discards if necessary, then the hypothesis graduates into a theory and possibly becomes a fact. Looks good on paper, but there is a serious problem in the science industry called the reproducibility crisis. Essentially, there's not much happening in the area of retesting and verification. It's bad enough in origins science, but when it affects people's lives through biomedical research, that's mighty low.

Credit: Freeimages / doctor-a (modified)
There are several reasons for this. One of the main reasons is that fame and fortune in the secular science industry goes to the ones who have the sensational news, especially if it claims to give evidence for minerals-to-mycologist evolution. Scientists and other people also need to know what does not work, but that information is often neglected.

In origins research, sometimes it actually is difficult to reproduce someone's research. Try obtaining the original material that was tested. Also, evolutionists are biased, and want to prove their point (often to give them self-justification in their rebellion against the Creator). Kind of hard to tell if their papers gave all the facts. Actually, we've seen that pertinent facts are omitted (here is one example), so it can make someone a mite wary when asked to take someone's word for something.

Another reason that test results are not reproduced often enough is human nature. We like incentives (I get an occasional gift card for working enough overtime, but I doubt that a gift card to the lab's commissary would be sufficient for them). Many people want the glory, and will cut corners and even cheat to get it. Because of the pressure to perform that some scientists face, well, they may do what it takes to get recognized. No glory in replication of someone else's work. But there may be some accolades in discovering that a "great discovery" was actually more fake science news. Some folks are stepping up and sounding the alarm.
Concerns about unreliable findings in biomedical research, such as cancer research, have been well documented. The problem is known as the ‘reproducibility crisis.’ If this is a problem in a field open to observation and visible in the here and now—biomedical research—what about evolution, which is based on events and extinct life forms that are claimed to have existed eons ago?
University of Bristol Professor Marcus Munafò writes in Nature in a book review about the crisis,
Nuh uh. You have to read the professor's remarks and the rest of the article by clicking on "Unreliability in Science Reaches Epic Proportions". You can also listen to an audio version with surprisingly good text-to-speech voices.

The inability and unwillingness to reproduce research in biomedical and evolutionary science is becoming outrageous. It also illustrates the fact that secular scientists are human and prone to the same vices as the rest of us.